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Northwest Iowa Dairy Outlooks

A local discussion of current science and issues concerning dairying in northwest iowa

The Lone Star Healthy Streams program educates Texas landowners on how to best protect waterways from bacterial contributions associated with horses, livestock and feral hogs. “In Tarrant County a large number of our small-acreage land-owners have horses and enjoy the lifestyle of trail-rides, horse-shows and rodeos,” says Tarrant County AgriLife Extension Agriculture and Natural Resources Agent Fred M. Hall. To help land-owners understand how their horses and other livestock can effect water quality downstream we have focused on the Eagle Mountain and Village Creek watersheds.

On Tuesday, November 1 the program will be hosted at the Tarrant County Resource Connection at 110 Circle Drive in Fort Worth and on Wednesday, November 2 it will be hosted at the Fort Worth Nature Center located at 9601 Fossil Ridge Road in Fort Worth.

Both programs start at 10 a.m. and run through 3 p.m. There is no cost to attend and a box lunch will be provided. However pre-registration on-line is required at:

http://agrilife.org/urbantarrantag/program-registration

The deadline to register for either program is Friday, October 26.

Workshop presentations will focus on watershed health of the upper Trinity River and will discuss basic watershed function, water quality and specific best management practices that can be implemented to help minimize bacterial contamination originating from horses, beef cattle and feral hogs. In addition, those holding a Private Pesticide Applicators license will earn three general CEUs.

Speakers will include Dr. Dennis Sigler, Texas A&M Agrilfe Extension horse specialist and Dr. Matt Brown, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension program specialist.

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