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Northwest Iowa Dairy Outlooks

A local discussion of current science and issues concerning dairying in northwest iowa

Category Archives: flood

Our topography and soil types prevent most crop damage during flooding; however, time, temperature and plant growth status are major factors that affect the extent of crop damage after a flood. This may become an issue with a prolonged rainy period. A June or July flood, for example, is often much worse for crop survival than a spring flood. The warmer mid-summer weather increases the rate of damage and death to submerged plants. During spring flooding, temperatures are colder and plants can survive longer under water.

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The Lone Star Healthy Streams program educates Texas landowners on how to best protect waterways from bacterial contributions associated with horses, livestock and feral hogs. “In Tarrant County a large number of our small-acreage land-owners have horses and enjoy the lifestyle of trail-rides, horse-shows and rodeos,” says Tarrant County AgriLife Extension Agriculture and Natural Resources Agent Fred M. Hall. To help land-owners understand how their horses and other livestock can effect water quality downstream we have focused on the Eagle Mountain and Village Creek watersheds.

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The fourth public meeting for the Village Creek-Lake Arlington Watershed Protection Partnership is set for 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, September 22. It will be held at the Texas Health Huguley Hospital fitness center amphitheater located at 11801 South Freeway in Burleson, Texas.

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Producers are reminded to keep thorough records of all losses, including livestock death losses, as well as expenses for such things as feed purchases and extraordinary costs because of lost supplies and or increased transportation costs.

It is recommended that owners and producers record all pertinent information of natural disaster consequences, including:

  • Documentation of the number and kind of livestock that have died, supplemented if possible by photographs or video records of ownership and losses;
  • Dates of death supported by birth recordings or purchase receipts;
  • Costs of transporting livestock to safer grounds or to move animals to new pastures;
  • Feed purchases if supplies or grazing pastures are destroyed;
  • Crop records, including seed and fertilizer purchases, planting and production records;
  • Pictures with dates of all damage by flood waters;
  • Evidence of damaged farm land.

For more information the USDA programs contact the local Farm Service Agency office at 817.645.7711. For information on managing livestock after a flood go to: http://texashelp.tamu.edu.

 

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Recent heavy rains have prompted state and local officials to declare states of disaster across a large number of Texas counties. “Local producers and animal owners recognize that whether they are in a disaster area or not, they have added management issues to deal with because of the saturated conditions,” says Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Agent Fred M. Hall in Tarrant County. After the immediate threat associated with fast moving flood water, cattle, horses and poultry all have special needs if they have been exposed to standing water. “Observations for flood-related disease, illness from consuming spoiled feed and injury from debris left by flood-waters are added to the daily husbandry of animal owners,” notes Hall.

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