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Northwest Iowa Dairy Outlooks

A local discussion of current science and issues concerning dairying in northwest iowa

Tag Archives: cattle

With near-record high temperatures this past week, it is hard to remember that the average “first freeze date” for the Tarrant County area is November 22. For cattlemen that date is important because after a freeze there is the potential for prussic acid poisoning of animals grazing forages in the sorghum family such as johnsongrass, sudangrass, forage sorghums and grain sorghum. Some other plants like chokecherries, wild cherries and mountain mahogany also have compounds that breakdown and result in liberated cyanide, which we commonly call prussic acid.

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In its fourth study of the beef cow-calf industry since 1993, the USDA’s National Animal Health Monitoring System (NAHMS) will collect new and valuable health and management information from cow-calf producers in the 24 states, including Texas. Those states will represent 87 percent of beef cows and 79 percent of beef cow operations.

From October through December 2017, representatives from the USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) will contact randomly selected beef cow-calf operators for phase 1 of the study. NASS representatives will conduct personal interviews with all participating operations that have one or more beef cows. For operations that choose to continue to phase II of the study and are eligible to do so, representatives from USDA’s Veterinary Services will visit from January through March 2018 to administer the phase II questionnaire. Representatives will also offer a range of biologic sampling activities in which producers can choose to participate.

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The folks at the VFD News Center remind us that some medications for swine requiring a veterinary feed directive (VFD) are indicated for use alone while others are approved for use in combination with over-the-counter (OTC) medications that don’t require a VFD.

For example, chlortetracycline, which will transition to a VFD medication on January 1, 2017, has several indications for use alone but it’s also approved for use with tiamulin, an OTC medication, for diseases including swine dysentery, bacterial enteritis and bacterial pneumonia.

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“Building margins in agriculture isn’t just about trimming expenses– its about spending money were it will yield the largest returns” says Tarrant County AgriLife Extension Agriculture Agent Fred M. Hall. “And this group of professionals will help any producer learn to selectively maximize their returns on the dollars they spend on fertilizer.” Hall continued. The program will be held on Friday, December 2 at the Tarrant County Resource Connection conference room located at 1100 Campus Drive in Fort Worth.

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The Lone Star Healthy Streams program educates Texas landowners on how to best protect waterways from bacterial contributions associated with horses, livestock and feral hogs. “In Tarrant County a large number of our small-acreage land-owners have horses and enjoy the lifestyle of trail rides, horse shows and rodeos,” says Tarrant County AgriLife Extension Agriculture and Natural Resources Agent Fred M. Hall. To help land-owners understand how their horses and other livestock can effect water quality downstream the programs will focus on the Eagle Mountain and Village Creek watersheds.

On Tuesday, November 1 the program will be hosted at the Tarrant County Resource Connection at 110 Circle Drive in Fort Worth and on Wednesday, November 2 it will be hosted at the Fort Worth Nature Center located at 9601 Fossil Ridge Road in Fort Worth.

Both programs start at 10 a.m. and run through 3 p.m. There is no cost to attend and a box lunch will be provided. However, pre-registration on-line is required at:

http://agrilife.org/urbantarrantag/program-registration

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TAMU Professor and AgriLife Extension Wildlife and Fisheries Specialist Bill Higginbotham has made five publications available on cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) toxicity in livestock drinking water. If a landowner suspects that blue-green algal blooms in a water trough or pond may be involved in livestock sickness or death, livestock should be moved to another source of water and water samples should be forwarded to the TVMDL for diagnostics. Although there are always exceptions, blue-green algal blooms are usually most prominent in the hottest time of the summer without significant rainfall (e.g., “stagnant” conditions)—and just because blue-green algae is present does not necessarily mean it will have an adverse impact on livestock and wildlife drinking it.

All five publications are available under livestock water quality at

http://agrilife.org/urbantarrantag/publications/

 

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Dr. Tiffany Dowell will present a one-hour webinar focusing on the rangeland challenges of ranching in oil and gas country. There is no fee but pre-registration is required at:

http://agrilife.org/urbantarrantag/program-registration/

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